Mar 192015
 

Jaime López Bermudez (Mexico City 1916-) is a Mexican artist and architect who lived and worked for at least several months in Ajijic in the mid-1940s. His stay there is briefly described in an article published in 1945 by American author Neill James, who had moved to Ajijic a couple of years earlier. Jaime López Bermudez, “a surrealist from the Capital, occupied a huertita overlooking the lake and worked for several months with his charming wife, Virginia, and a Mexican cat for company.” It seems more likely that Virginia was a girlfriend, since López Bermudez’s status is listed as “single” on the certificate of his marriage to American-born Josephine Blanche Cohen Soholski in Mexico City in December 1949.

Portrait of Jaime Lopez Bermudez, ca 1951, by Elizabeth Timberman.

Portrait of Jaime Lopez Bermudez, ca 1951, by Elizabeth Timberman.

López Bermudez exhibited some of his painting in a group show in 1944 at the Villa Montecarlo in Chapala, alongside paintings by Betty Binkley, Ernesto Butterlin (“Lin”), Otto Butterlin, Ann Medalie, Sylvia Fein and others.

In the early 1950s, López Bermudez gained reputation as an architect. He was considered one of Mexico’s more important “modernist” architects, and featured in a special August 1951 issue of Arts and Architecture devoted to Mexican architecture. That issue includes photos of a one-bedroom home designed and built by López Bermudez (for himself) in the Santa Fe district close to Mexico City. The design is a modernist, steel-framed one bedroom house, with garage underneath, which could be completed for under 1500 dollars. According to the accompanying text, “Jaime López Bermudez is a painter as well architect, this duel role being a commonplace among young and old of his profession in Mexico. The  mural on the front of the house is his.”

Though the precise dates are unclear, López Bermudez opened and ran an art gallery, Galeria Coyote Flaco, in upscale Coyoacán, in the southern part of Mexico City, for several years. In the early 1960s, López Bermudez was the first to recognize the artistic talent of British-American photographer Jon Naar. He persuaded Naar to exhibit his photographs of Mexico City street scenes in the Galeria Coyote Flaco in 1963. The exhibit, entitled “El Ojo de un extrañjero” (“The eye of an outsider”) launched Naar onto a hugely successful career as an artist-photographer.

Sombrero Books welcomes comments, corrections or additional material related to any of the writers and artists featured in our series of mini-bios. Please use the comments feature at the bottom of individual posts, or email us.

  5 Responses to “Jaime Lopez Bermudez, artist and architect”

  1. Arquitecto y Pintor Jaime Lopez Bermudez, was my uncle and brother of Angel Marcelo Lopez Bermudez (my father) a renown Mexican Violinist, Conductor, Composer, and founding member of the world famous Magic Violins (Los Violines Magicos de Villafontana). All of my uncles Manolo an Ingeneer/Attorney and uncle Alfonso an Attorney were probably a group of brothers who were very inteligent and creative. My uncles and my fayher left us a great deal of memories and we love every moment.

    • Thank you for your comments, which are very interesting. What a talented family!
      I would like to learn more about the life and works of your uncle, and will email you some specific questions in the hope that you can help me understand more about him. Thanks again for taking the time to comment, Tony

  2. Hi, I’m checking the biographical information of Jaime Lopez Bermudez for a research work. Please, please, contact me

  3. My Uncle Jaime…What a great man! Intelligent, Artistic, Smart, Talented, Handsome. Magnificent culinary expert; Fantastic Host! Fifty years ago, with his architectural designs, he had the vision to develop the solutions to resolve the present ecological issues we have today. This month would have been his 100th birthday. I love you Uncle!

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